The Expressive Impulse
253
allegoryofart:

The Colossus, Francisco de Goya, 1808

allegoryofart:

The ColossusFrancisco de Goya, 1808

544
catmota:

Harbor of Trieste  (1907)
Egon Schiele  
more works by this artist

catmota:

Harbor of Trieste  (1907)

Egon Schiele  

more works by this artist

211

artmastered:

Balthus, Palette series, 1985, painting palettes, [dimensions variable], The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Source

In this series, Balthus transforms the humble palette into its own canvas by experimenting with the colours and textures of freshly applied paint.

221
blastedheath:

Albert Oehlen (German, b. 1954), Idol II, 2003. Oil on canvas, 179 x 169 cm.

blastedheath:

Albert Oehlen (German, b. 1954), Idol II, 2003. Oil on canvas, 179 x 169 cm.

243
centuriespast:

FRIEDRICH, Caspar DavidFog in the Elbe Valley1821Oil on canvas, 33 x 43 cmNationalgalerie, Berlin

centuriespast:

FRIEDRICH, Caspar David
Fog in the Elbe Valley
1821
Oil on canvas, 33 x 43 cm
Nationalgalerie, Berlin

231
centuriespast:

MANET, EdouardIn the Winter Garden1879Oil on canvas, 115 x 150 cmStaatliche Museen, Berlin

centuriespast:

MANET, Edouard
In the Winter Garden
1879
Oil on canvas, 115 x 150 cm
Staatliche Museen, Berlin

85
artmastered:

Giovanni Bellini, Portrait of Doge Leonardo Loredan, 1501, oil on panel, 62 x 45 cm, The National Gallery, London. Source
Leonardo Loredan became the doge of Venice the same year that this portrait was painted, and he maintained the position until his death in 1521. Bellini’s portrait of Loredan is unusual because of it’s front-on position; these kinds of figures were usually painted in profile.

artmastered:

Giovanni Bellini, Portrait of Doge Leonardo Loredan, 1501, oil on panel, 62 x 45 cm, The National Gallery, London. Source

Leonardo Loredan became the doge of Venice the same year that this portrait was painted, and he maintained the position until his death in 1521. Bellini’s portrait of Loredan is unusual because of it’s front-on position; these kinds of figures were usually painted in profile.

117
centuriespast:

ROSA, SalvatorSelf-Portrait as Philosopher of Silencec. 1641Oil on canvas, 116 x 94 cmNational Gallery, London

centuriespast:

ROSA, Salvator
Self-Portrait as Philosopher of Silence
c. 1641
Oil on canvas, 116 x 94 cm
National Gallery, London

fashionsfromhistory:

La Capresses des Colonies
Charles-Henri-Joseph Cordier
1861

In his unpublished memoirs Charles Cordier cites the law of April 27, 1848 that abolished slavery in France and its colonies, writing: “My art incorporated the reality of a whole new subject, the revolt against slavery and the birth of anthropology.” In pioneering ethnography as a subject for sculpture in the nineteenth century, Cordier aimed to illustrate what he described as “the idea of the universality of beauty.” His busts often paired couples of the opposite sex but of the same race. This rare instance of matched busts of women was desired by the purchaser, a gaming club in Marseilles, that also commissioned the sumptuous Second-Empire pedestals from Cordier. 
The busts revel in the period taste for polychromy in sculpture, an international phenomenon sparked by artistic debates about the painting of ancient statuary and inspired by ancient Roman and Renaissance sculpture composed of variously colored marbles. On a trip to Algeria in 1856 Cordier discovered onyx deposits in recently reopened ancient quarries and began to use the stone in busts such as these. He ingeniously fitted enameled bronze heads into the vibrantly patterned stone, creating exciting though costly representations of Africans that appealed to the highest levels of European society. (MET)

MET

fashionsfromhistory:

La Capresses des Colonies

Charles-Henri-Joseph Cordier

1861

In his unpublished memoirs Charles Cordier cites the law of April 27, 1848 that abolished slavery in France and its colonies, writing: “My art incorporated the reality of a whole new subject, the revolt against slavery and the birth of anthropology.” In pioneering ethnography as a subject for sculpture in the nineteenth century, Cordier aimed to illustrate what he described as “the idea of the universality of beauty.” His busts often paired couples of the opposite sex but of the same race. This rare instance of matched busts of women was desired by the purchaser, a gaming club in Marseilles, that also commissioned the sumptuous Second-Empire pedestals from Cordier. 

The busts revel in the period taste for polychromy in sculpture, an international phenomenon sparked by artistic debates about the painting of ancient statuary and inspired by ancient Roman and Renaissance sculpture composed of variously colored marbles. On a trip to Algeria in 1856 Cordier discovered onyx deposits in recently reopened ancient quarries and began to use the stone in busts such as these. He ingeniously fitted enameled bronze heads into the vibrantly patterned stone, creating exciting though costly representations of Africans that appealed to the highest levels of European society. (MET)

MET

187

centuriespast:

MEMLING, Hans
Vanity (details)
c. 1485
Oil on wood, 22 x 14 cm
Musée des Beaux-Arts, Strasbourg